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Scottish Cancer Prevention Network | Putting Prevention First

Papers of the year 2016:Substantial contribution of extrinsic risk factors to cancer development.

Once again we are nearing the end of the year, and here at the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network, we’ve invited our members, colleagues and regular SCPN Newsletter contributors to recommend what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2016. We’ve asked each of them to recommend one paper which they thought would be valuable to share. Next in our series of Papers of the Year 2016. This paper got top marks from Dr David Brewster, Director of the Scottish Cancer registry, Information services Division, NHS National services Scotland Continue reading “Papers of the year 2016:Substantial contribution of extrinsic risk factors to cancer development.”

Papers of the Year: Pancreatic Cancer

Once again we are nearing the end of the year, and here at the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network, we’ve invited our members, colleagues and regular SCPN Newsletter contributors to recommend what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2016. We’ve asked each of them to recommend one paper which they thought would be valuable to share. This week our second instalment comes to us courtesy of Prof James Garden of Edinburgh University, we hope you enjoy.

Papers of the Year – Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense

Once again December is upon us, and here at the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network, we’ve invited our members, colleagues and regular SCPN Newsletter contributors to recommend what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2016. We asked each of them for one paper which they thought would be valuable to share and so kicking us off is Nicola Barnstable, Diane Primrose & The Detect Cancer Early Team, we hope you enjoy.

Title: Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense

Continue reading “Papers of the Year – Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense”

Prevention could one day half the rates of breast cancer in the UK – What will it take?

Around 50,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the UK.  It is estimated that around half of these cases could be prevented.  So what does it take to achieve that? Firstly, we need to know much more about the causes of the disease.  Secondly, we need to act on information as we learn of its importance.

Continue reading “Prevention could one day half the rates of breast cancer in the UK – What will it take?”

FIT – ONE Test – but TWO Very Different Applications

I am 71 years old and have enjoyed reasonably good health all my life, although osteoarthritis of the knees and cataracts are now two of the joys of growing older. I have taken part in the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme every two years since the first pilot back in 2000. These are facts. The following story is fictional, but the scenario is likely to become a real conundrum for many in the not too distant future.

Continue reading “FIT – ONE Test – but TWO Very Different Applications”

Health organisations: “Be the change you want to see in the world”

At its simplest level, the job of people wanting to reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is to “redefine what’s normal”.

We have to make smoke free areas normal. We have to make healthy food routine. We have to make being physically active unremarkable. We have to make non-alcoholic drinks the expected.

Continue reading “Health organisations: “Be the change you want to see in the world””

Bowel Screening – Personal and Professional Reflections

Every two years I receive a letter from myself. I know what it is before I open it, from the NHS logo on the envelope and the shape and feel of the contents. This is, of course, my bowel screening test, and the invitation letter is signed by me as Clinical Director of the Scottish Bowel Screening Programme. Thus, by virtue of my age, I send myself a letter on a regular basis.

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Be careful what you wish for…

Once upon a time there was a very, very big family who had to eat a diet of oats, wholegrain bread, home grown vegetables and some home grown fruit, but very little sugar. Meat, cheese, butter and hard cooking fat were scarce, and even milk and tea were limited. They had to walk and cycle a lot because cars weren’t so common as they are now, and fuel was rationed. The family weren’t very happy because lots of bad things were happening in the world but they were terribly healthy. When the world settled down and peace came, they all wished for sweeties, cakes, bacon, sweet drinks and white bread.

Continue reading “Be careful what you wish for…”

Changing our Culture of Excess

by Louise Codling, Head of Policy and Public Affairs at World Cancer Research Fund.

Our analysis of global research shows strong evidence that being overweight or obese is linked to an increased risk of several cancers. These findings come at a time when there is a growing trend of overweight and obesity around the world. Globally there are around 1.9 billion people who are overweight or obese, and this number is increasing in both higher and lower income countries. It is clear that more needs to be done to tackle overweight and obesity by reducing the amount of unhealthy food that people eat. However this is incredibly complex and requires action at every possible level, from government right down to the individual.

Continue reading “Changing our Culture of Excess”

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