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FIT – Vigilance is Needed to Ensure Validity

To all those using, or planning to use, faecal immunochemical tests for haemoglobin (FIT) in bowel cancer screening programmes, there was some disturbing news last week. In British Columbia (BC), Canada, use of FIT ceased due to a problem with a reagent used in analysis of the samples. On the official website, it is stated that work to resolve this as quickly as possible is underway and the organisers will have a better idea of timing in the next few weeks: however, it could take a number of months for FIT analyses to resume. The details and consequences are very well documented.

Continue reading “FIT – Vigilance is Needed to Ensure Validity”

Shifting Evidence of Breast Cancer in Night Shift Work

In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer|World Health Organization (IARC|WHO) concluded that the effects of shift work on the disruption of normal circadian rhythm had a probable link to breast cancer. IARC suggest that our endogenous 24-hour body clocks may be subject to interference by factors such as exposure to light at night, and it’s impact on melatonin levels may be linked to breast cancer. However, a recent meta-analysis led by Dr Ruth C. Travis published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute concludes that night shift work may actually have very little effect on breast cancer risk.

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Lifestyle Trials are Feasible in Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK and its incidence is increasing. However, survival rates are also increasing. In Scotland, age-standardised, five year survivorship rates have increased from 42.9% in 1987-91 to 64.7% in 2007-11. More people surviving after a bowel cancer diagnosis is fantastic news, but there is considerable room for improvement in both quantity and quality of years; multi-modal treatment pathways, risk of complications and the possibility of a stoma can cause prolonged physical and psychological recovery.

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Papers of the Year: Pancreatic Cancer

Once again we are nearing the end of the year, and here at the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network, we’ve invited our members, colleagues and regular SCPN Newsletter contributors to recommend what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2016. We’ve asked each of them to recommend one paper which they thought would be valuable to share. This week our second instalment comes to us courtesy of Prof James Garden of Edinburgh University, we hope you enjoy.

Papers of the Year – Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense

Once again December is upon us, and here at the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network, we’ve invited our members, colleagues and regular SCPN Newsletter contributors to recommend what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2016. We asked each of them for one paper which they thought would be valuable to share and so kicking us off is Nicola Barnstable, Diane Primrose & The Detect Cancer Early Team, we hope you enjoy.

Title: Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense

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Papers of the Year: An Innovative Approach to Improving Rates of Bowel Screening in a Disadvantaged Population

Our penultimate blog comes from Prof Bob Steele, Clinical Director, Scottish Bowel Screening Programme and our very own co-director. He has chosen a paper which discusses an innovative approach to improving rates of bowel screening in a disadvantaged population, a challenge that’s very pertinent to us here in Scotland.

Title: Comparative Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Intervention
to Improve Adherence to Annual Colorectal Cancer Screening
in Community Health Centers

Continue reading “Papers of the Year: An Innovative Approach to Improving Rates of Bowel Screening in a Disadvantaged Population”

Papers of the Year: Carcinogenicity of Consumption of Red & Processed Meat

Some papers are buried deep in journals and get little airtime… this summary paper which appeared in the Lancet generated more discussion on diet and cancer prevention than most things published this year and is the “paper of the year” for consultant colorectal surgeon Miss Susan Moug (Consultant Surgeon, The Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley; Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer, University of Glasgow)

Title: Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat.

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Papers of the Year: Suspected Cancer – Recognition and Referral

This month SCPN has invited regular SCPN newsletter contributors to tell us about what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2015. We asked for one paper they thought valuable to share. Professor Callum Fraser has contributed a NICE guideline for your enjoyment.

Title: Suspected cancer: recognition and referral

Continue reading “Papers of the Year: Suspected Cancer – Recognition and Referral”

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