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obesity

Papers of the Year – Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense

Once again December is upon us, and here at the Scottish Cancer Prevention Network, we’ve invited our members, colleagues and regular SCPN Newsletter contributors to recommend what they have been reading on cancer prevention during 2016. We asked each of them for one paper which they thought would be valuable to share and so kicking us off is Nicola Barnstable, Diane Primrose & The Detect Cancer Early Team, we hope you enjoy.

Title: Tipping The Scales: Why Preventing Obesity Makes Economic Sense

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Our obesogenic, carcinogenic environment – a legacy for our children

The relationship between obesity and cancer has been well described…and well ignored! Exposure to excess body fat will contribute to increased risk of some of the most common cancers including bowel and breast. Yet, few agencies working in the cancer settings (including the NHS) bring this to the attention of the millions of people who are in contact with healthcare every day. Many think it is a duty of care for people to be given advice on how to “stack the odds” against cancer occurrence (and recurrence) and that we deny people the opportunity to be supported to reduce cancer risk.

Continue reading “Our obesogenic, carcinogenic environment – a legacy for our children”

Attention to Action

Every day the evidence grows. Every day we learn more about how obesity affects our health. Every day the media give this issue attention. But is this translating into action?

The recent report from IARC reaffirms the significant health consequences associated with excess weight.  We need to take action now to reduce future cancer incidence.

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Auntie Jean and Auntie Norma – Challenges in Cancer Prevention

Everyone knows of an ‘Auntie Jean’. She is the older woman, who liked a good drink, hearty meals, and big puddings and specialises in spectator sport (with feet up in front of the telly). She scores 0 for lifestyle actions for reducing cancer risk. Not a second thought to worrying about health (“the doctor never said I was doing anything wrong“), lived well over the three score years and ten, and dropped dead one day without bothering a soul.

Continue reading “Auntie Jean and Auntie Norma – Challenges in Cancer Prevention”

Cutting Cancer Cases – Ready Steady Go!

More than two thousand years ago Hippocrates, the Father of Modern Medicine, noted that if we all had “the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health”. In general, all too few of us are following Hippocrates’ advice today.

In cancer terms, we know that 4 in 10 cancer cases in the UK could be prevented largely by changes to lifestyle. In this blog post I’ll be looking at one of these changes: being physically active. Continue reading “Cutting Cancer Cases – Ready Steady Go!”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month: Reducing Risk is Everyone’s Business

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts. Here’s the next instalment from Professor Annie S. Anderson.

I would like the public to know that getting bowel cancer is not about bad luck and fate.

Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month: Reducing Risk is Everyone’s Business”

Confessions of a Converted Pedestrian: The Art of the Silent Clench

Another installment of Kate Cunningham’s Confessions of a Converted Pedestrian….

Will these rains never cease? Really though. I can walk in rain but gales are a whole new ball game. A childhood lived in a hurricane zone has left me a bit fearful of wind if I’m honest, and being blown about leaves me a quite panicked. Add to that a month of end to end meetings and deadlines…and I was facing some enforced inactivity.

Continue reading “Confessions of a Converted Pedestrian: The Art of the Silent Clench”

Laughing in the Rain

We love when someone offers to write a guest blog and we were particularly pleased when Ms Susan J. Moug, Consultant Surgeon and Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer at Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley shared their experiences of running a walking group for survivors of colorectal cancer. Sounds like they had great fun along the way!

 

Last year the colorectal team at Royal Alexandra Hospital (RAH) Paisley started a 6-week walking programme for colorectal cancer survivors. Armed with the knowledge that increasing physical activity is beneficial for cancer survivors and with the success of programmes like www.walkwithadoc.org we decided to put our best feet forward.

Continue reading “Laughing in the Rain”

Confessions of a Converted Pedestrian: Plantar Fasciitis

Another installment of Kate Cunningham’s Confessions of a Converted Pedestrian….

Before you close your browser and run screaming to your Ebola bunker it’s not the flesh eating one. The flesh eating one is necrotising. The foot one is just plain agonising. I had suffered from this one before after the birth of my second child and it went away after a few weeks with the judicious application of Birkenstocks. An inflammatory skin condition means I can’t take painkillers which is both a blessing and a curse so when it returned (with an inflaming vengeance!)  I was pretty downhearted.

Continue reading “Confessions of a Converted Pedestrian: Plantar Fasciitis”

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