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Scottish Cancer Prevention Network | Putting Prevention First

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junk food

#EatingOutWithKids – A Granny’s perspective

Growth in childhood matters. It impacts on health through to adulthood and impacts on cancer risk. What children eat matters and how we support good eating matters. It matters what gets marketed, promoted and offered. We have much less control than we would like. This month we set out some experiences that show the challenges when #eatingoutwithkids

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Should we call a spade a shovel? Polite names for Junk Foods and other extra calorie sources

Last week we launched our social media campaign called #sackthesnack inviting readers to take the challenge of swopping one daily snack for alternative behaviours like taking 200 steps, doing a little #kettlecise stretching or maybe even standing and moving to take a short phone call. The rationale for focussing on snacks was because snacks like biscuits, cakes, pastries, crisps and sugary drinks provide a fifth of our calories and cutting even one of these snacks in our daily life (and burning a few calories extra) might help us on the way to re-balancing our energy intake.

Continue reading “Should we call a spade a shovel? Polite names for Junk Foods and other extra calorie sources”

Junk Marketing – No Thank YOU

I saw an exciting news item for health and cancer risk reduction in the new Government programme for work in 2017-18 (A nation with Ambition). On page 95 (yes, you have to scroll quite far) I saw this announcement:

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Our obesogenic, carcinogenic environment – a legacy for our children

The relationship between obesity and cancer has been well described…and well ignored! Exposure to excess body fat will contribute to increased risk of some of the most common cancers including bowel and breast. Yet, few agencies working in the cancer settings (including the NHS) bring this to the attention of the millions of people who are in contact with healthcare every day. Many think it is a duty of care for people to be given advice on how to “stack the odds” against cancer occurrence (and recurrence) and that we deny people the opportunity to be supported to reduce cancer risk.

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Attention to Action

Every day the evidence grows. Every day we learn more about how obesity affects our health. Every day the media give this issue attention. But is this translating into action?

The recent report from IARC reaffirms the significant health consequences associated with excess weight.  We need to take action now to reduce future cancer incidence.

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