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Scottish Cancer Prevention Network | Putting Prevention First

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Bowel Cancer

New season – but they still want cake!

Schools are back and the season is changing. As we transition from a hot summer to darker autumn days  the need for comforting, warmer food starts to enter our thoughts. Seasonal eating could never be easier than in autumn as we see apples, pears and plums weighing down branches. Tatties, parsnips, and other roots waiting to be lifted and squashes and broccoli ready to colour our plates.  

But still the kids want cake!!

Continue reading “New season – but they still want cake!”

FIT – a little goes a long way

Faecal immunochemical tests for haemoglobin (FIT) are now used in asymptomatic bowel screening programmes and also in assessment of patients presenting with lower bowel symptoms.  FIT specimen collection devices have a stick attached to the cap of the tube: this stick has dimples or grooves near the end to collect the correct amount of faeces. Our instructions are simple, namely, “dip the end of the stick into your poo” and “scrape the end of the stick along the sample”, and have pictures of exactly what sample is required. However, many seem surprised at how little faeces is collected, only 2 mg in the FIT used in Scotland for both clinical purposes.  Interestingly, some assume that more must be better and do try very hard to give a little (or a lot) extra in the device!  To date, very little attention has been paid to this aspect of FIT.  Recently, however, a very relevant paper has been published.1

Continue reading “FIT – a little goes a long way”

Cutting Cancer Cases – Ready Steady Go!

More than two thousand years ago Hippocrates, the Father of Modern Medicine, noted that if we all had “the right amount of nourishment and exercise, not too little and not too much, we would have found the safest way to health”. In general, all too few of us are following Hippocrates’ advice today.

In cancer terms, we know that 4 in 10 cancer cases in the UK could be prevented largely by changes to lifestyle. In this blog post I’ll be looking at one of these changes: being physically active. Continue reading “Cutting Cancer Cases – Ready Steady Go!”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month: Working Together To Stay Well

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts. Here’s the final instalment from Debbie Provan.

I would like the public to know that healthy lifestyle choices are still important after a diagnosis of bowel cancer, and that whole families can work together on this. Whilst those being treated for bowel cancer may have some dietary restrictions placed upon them as a result of treatment, in general people should aim to eat a well balanced diet, keep physically active and maintain a healthy body weight Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month: Working Together To Stay Well”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – You Are Not Alone

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts. Here’s the next instalment from the Detect Cancer Early team.

I would like the public to know…they’re not alone.

The bowel screening test is completed in the comfort of your own home. It’s therefore no surprise that many people feel like they’re the only one that’s asked to do it.

Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – You Are Not Alone”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – A Positive Test Does Not Mean You Have Bowel Cancer

 

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts. Here’s the next instalment from Bowel Cancer Nurse Specialist, Aileen Roy.

I should like the public aged over 50, to do the test, and help prevent cancer. If found early cancer is more likely to be curable. The bowel screening test can be done in the comfort of your home bathroom.

A positive test does not mean you have bowel cancer.

Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – A Positive Test Does Not Mean You Have Bowel Cancer”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – What the public should know about bowel cancer

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts. Here’s the next instalment from consultant colorectal surgeon, Susan Moug.

What the public should know about bowel cancer –
It is very common in the U.K. It usually affects the over 50s, but can occur in younger people. It can cause unexplained changes in your bowel habit or bleeding that last for a few weeks.

Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – What the public should know about bowel cancer”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month: Reducing Risk is Everyone’s Business

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts. Here’s the next instalment from Professor Annie S. Anderson.

I would like the public to know that getting bowel cancer is not about bad luck and fate.

Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month: Reducing Risk is Everyone’s Business”

Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – What can we do to reduce our personal risk of bowel cancer?

As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness month, we’re running a series of mini-blogs from cancer experts . Here’s the next instalment from Dr Aileen Keel CBE.

I’d like to see greater public awareness of what individuals can do to reduce their personal risk of bowel cancer. Of course, an important part of that is taking part in the bowel screening programme.

Continue reading “Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – What can we do to reduce our personal risk of bowel cancer?”

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