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Scottish Cancer Prevention Network | Putting Prevention First

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Physical Activity

Men’s Health – #Aboutabike

This month we have been highlighting mens health as part of #MensHealthMonth. MHM includes supporting men to increase or maintain physical activity levels depending on current activity levels (often tricky in older years as knee and join pain become more apparent!). Cycling has the potential to help many people achieve suggested physical activity goals, especially if incorporated into everyday life. However, not everyone can cycle sufficient distances due to poor physical fitness, long commuting distance and steep Scottish hills! Electric bikes (e-bikes) can make cycling more accessible to the wider population providing uphill and long distance assistance. Of course, some people will believe that e-cycling does not constitute exercise due to the assistance given by the bike, BUT continual pedalling is still required before assistance from the bike kicks in. Furthermore, a recent systematic review reports e-bikes provide moderate intensity physical activity for both physically active and inactive individuals [1]. 

Continue reading “Men’s Health – #Aboutabike”
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Whether a #worksitewander or 5 minute stretch remember every little counts.

Having trained as physiotherapist, physical activity is always something I have been interested in. I enjoyed the challenge of working with people who had suffered illness or injury and using physical activity and structured exercise as a tool to improve both physical and mental health. We all know physical activity can reduce the risk of developing many conditions, including cancer, but something that is frequently not given adequate attention is the importance of physical activity in self-care and work-life balance. Continue reading “Whether a #worksitewander or 5 minute stretch remember every little counts.”

‘Living the message’ at WCRF International

At WCRF we fund research into cancer prevention and survival through diet, weight and physical activity. We then turn this evidence into practical, straightforward advice and information to help anyone who wants to reduce their risk of developing cancer. But we don’t just talk the talk; we are encouraged to lead by example, especially when in the office.

Continue reading “‘Living the message’ at WCRF International”

Small Changes make BIG Impacts

I’m now over half a year into my first full time job and I’ve been thinking back to that very first day back in September when I was presented with an adjustable standing desk. I was rather shocked, this was not the office environment I had been expecting! Friends had told me about their workplace, sitting all day, cakes and biscuits galore, chip shop lunches and I thought that sounded great. So I was reluctant to fully embrace the idea of a ‘healthy worksite’ but my attitude quickly changed once I saw my step count was abysmally low!

Continue reading “Small Changes make BIG Impacts”

MOVE MORE, Scotland

There are an estimated 2.5 million people living with cancer in the UK, a figure that is projected to rise to 4 million by 2030.1

Physical activity can benefit patients at all stages of the cancer care pathway. Keeping active can improve survival rates, help maintain quality of life, improve sleep, have mental health benefits, reduce fatigue and risk of falls.2 In some cases, being physically active has been shown to slow disease progression, improve survival and reduce the chance of recurrence.3 Continue reading “MOVE MORE, Scotland”

Paper of the Year 2018: Dr Katie Robb

Continuing our paper of the year selection…. Health psychologist and winner of the 2018 Scottish Cancer Foundation Prize and Evans Forrest medal Dr Katie Robb from University of Glasgow highlights the following paper about changing cancer related lifestyles and importantly our environments.

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2018: Dr Katie Robb”

Paper of the Year 2018: Ann Gates

One of the SCPN favourite tasks is sharing current science and evidence relating to factors that influence cancer prevention and screening. Whilst many people are exploring favourite reads of the year for Christmas reading we ask some of our SCPN friends to tell us about their recommended read or paper of the year for sharing. This year we start with our recommendation from Ann Gates – perhaps better known as @Exerciseworks. Increasing physical activity is a key pillar in reducing cancer risk and finding ways to support and encourage active lifestyles is crucial to healthy ways of life..

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2018: Ann Gates”

Medical student: What the 12 codes against cancer taught me about cancer prevention

During first year of medical school, I walked in to my nutrition tutorial eating chocolate buttons and I was told off by the person undertaking the session. I proceeded to place the chocolate in my bag, listen to how we need to eat our “five a day” and minimise sugar intake and then left the class to finish off my chocolate. During the first three years of medical school, we are taught about a long list of conditions that result from an unhealthy lifestyle. This comes in contrast with the very little teaching we get on lifestyle modification. So, if my teaching on this topic is limited, how am I expected to embrace this lifestyle myself and subsequently deliver it effectively to my patients? Continue reading “Medical student: What the 12 codes against cancer taught me about cancer prevention”

Changing lifestyles… you are never too old

During Sober October we are continuing our series on people who decided to think twice about drinking.

Like many mainly retired people, after I ceased the very active way of life associated with my full-time work, my weight gradually increased over the years. This was in spite of leading a fairly active lifestyle, including swimming nearly most mornings and lots of walking. I also thought that ate reasonably healthily – including the recommended five portions of fruit and veg per day. 

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However, my real problem was that I really enjoyed red wine and my daily intake had increased and increased and increased over the years. And, of course, red wine must be accompanied by a copious intake of crisps, nuts, and oatcakes, spread thickly with butter and topped with large amounts of cheese.  I made the usual excuses: I enjoy drinking wine since it is relaxing and sociable and alleviates stress, I can certainly afford it, I don’t have to get up and go to work anymore and I don’t need to drive much since I have a bus pass.  And, the wonderful rationale of: well, I see all these old guys like me in the gym dressing room, and I am not nearly as overweight as some of them! Continue reading “Changing lifestyles… you are never too old”

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