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Scottish Cancer Prevention Network | Putting Prevention First

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Colorectal Cancer

Don’t Stop Taking the Medicine

A false positive result – a positive test for occult blood in faeces with no significant disease subsequently found on colonoscopy – is quite a common finding in bowel screening programmes. One of the reasons given for this is that bleeding into the gut could occur other than when colorectal neoplasia is present, including in participants using oral anti-coagulants (OCs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including aspirin (NSAIDs). Of course, these medicines are commonly used in the 50-74 year old population invited for bowel screening in Scotland. Continue reading “Don’t Stop Taking the Medicine”

Paper of the Year 2017: Susan Moug

We asked SCPN friends and advisors to tell us about a report/paper/findings/work on cancer screening and prevention that has been published this year and has made them stop and think. The works span a wide range of areas from very detailed scientific investigation, reviews of physical activities, and blogs of model work. We find them a complete inspiration. When only 3% of the NCRI research budget is spent on prevention and virtually nil on implementation research; these papers provide a window on some of the very good reasons why cancer screening and prevention should be a leading part of cancer control research.

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2017: Susan Moug”

Paper of the Year 2017: Professor Bob Steele and Professor Annie Anderson

We asked SCPN friends and advisors to tell us about a report/paper/findings/work on cancer screening and prevention that has been published this year and has made them stop and think. The works span a wide range of areas from very detailed scientific investigation, reviews of physical activities, and blogs of model work. We find them a complete inspiration. When only 3% of the NCRI research budget is spent on prevention and virtually nil on implementation research; these papers provide a window on some of the very good reasons why cancer screening and prevention should be a leading part of cancer control research.

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2017: Professor Bob Steele and Professor Annie Anderson”

Paper of the Year 2017: Prof. Callum Fraser

We asked SCPN friends and advisors to tell us about a report/paper/findings/work on cancer screening and prevention that has been published this year and has made them stop and think. The works span a wide range of areas from very detailed scientific investigation, reviews of physical activities, and blogs of model work. We find them a complete inspiration. When only 3% of the NCRI research budget is spent on prevention and virtually nil on implementation research; these papers provide a window on some of the very good reasons why cancer screening and prevention should be a leading part of cancer control research.

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2017: Prof. Callum Fraser”

Paper of the Year 2017: Dr Graham Colditz

We asked SCPN friends and advisors to tell us about a report/paper/findings/work on cancer screening and prevention that has been published this year and has made them stop and think. The works span a wide range of areas from very detailed scientific investigation, reviews of physical activities, and blogs of model work. We find them a complete inspiration. When only 3% of the NCRI research budget is spent on prevention and virtually nil on implementation research; these papers provide a window on some of the very good reasons why cancer screening and prevention should be a leading part of cancer control research.

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2017: Dr Graham Colditz”

Paper of the Year 2017: Nanette Mutrie

We asked SCPN friends and advisors to tell us about a report/paper/findings/work on cancer screening and prevention that has been published this year and has made them stop and think. The works span a wide range of areas from very detailed scientific investigation, reviews of physical activities, and blogs of model work. We find them a complete inspiration. When only 3% of the NCRI research budget is spent on prevention and virtually nil on implementation research; these papers provide a window on some of the very good reasons why cancer screening and prevention should be a leading part of cancer control research.

Continue reading “Paper of the Year 2017: Nanette Mutrie”

FIT – Vigilance is Needed to Ensure Validity

To all those using, or planning to use, faecal immunochemical tests for haemoglobin (FIT) in bowel cancer screening programmes, there was some disturbing news last week. In British Columbia (BC), Canada, use of FIT ceased due to a problem with a reagent used in analysis of the samples. On the official website, it is stated that work to resolve this as quickly as possible is underway and the organisers will have a better idea of timing in the next few weeks: however, it could take a number of months for FIT analyses to resume. The details and consequences are very well documented.

Continue reading “FIT – Vigilance is Needed to Ensure Validity”

Would You Miss Red and Processed Meat?

There aren’t many good things to report about dietary trends in Scotland but one that does stand out is our decreasing consumption of red and processed meat – albeit by a modest amount.

Continue reading “Would You Miss Red and Processed Meat?”

Lifestyle Trials are Feasible in Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK and its incidence is increasing. However, survival rates are also increasing. In Scotland, age-standardised, five year survivorship rates have increased from 42.9% in 1987-91 to 64.7% in 2007-11. More people surviving after a bowel cancer diagnosis is fantastic news, but there is considerable room for improvement in both quantity and quality of years; multi-modal treatment pathways, risk of complications and the possibility of a stoma can cause prolonged physical and psychological recovery.

Continue reading “Lifestyle Trials are Feasible in Colorectal Cancer”

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